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Dried fruits: Is the latest snack good or bad?




Dried fruit (different from dry fruits/nuts) is the faddy snack of the day, for they are portable without the risk of leaking their juices and are healthy or so we believe. Many brands have come up in the markets that are competing to sell dried fruits by appealing through their 'healthy' tags. But, before you nosh on these little sweeties, there are things you must know about them. 

It's too much fiber

Fruits are one of the best sources of fiber. However, when you dehydrate them, their concentrations of the fiber and nutrients go much higher. Hence, you get a lot of antioxidants for lesser amount, which is a yay thing, but you also intake a lot of fiber, which your body may find hard to deal with and cause cramps and bloating. 

It has a lot of calories

Now, because the dried fruits are concentrated, so is there sugar. Big amounts of sugar can lead to difficulties of digestion. The component that's problematic is sulfitis as it can lead to headaches and diarrhea. So, if you choose sulfite-free options, you should be good. 

But it's a good substitute for binge-snacking

Having said all the above, breaking on these colouful teensies is better than eating fried or maida based snacks. However, there are certain things that you should keep in mind:

Pair them with a lot of water: When you consume high fiber, you also need water to be able to digest that much fiber. If you are low on hydration, you may get constipated. 

Pair it with protein: Your dried fruits can give you a full tummy if you pair it right. A protein or fat source such as yogurt or nuts can help. Also, they make sue that you don't overdo on sugar or fiber. 

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